Why does my Baby’s Days crash regularly? Is it because it isn’t a website?

As blogged last night a fair few number of people have posted in the Baby’s Days support group or messaged me directly to say they are experiencing technical issues using mainly the Risk Assessment section, The 2 year check and also the SEF section of Baby’s Days.

What seems to be happening is mid way through using these sections the device just freezes so the work is lost or a little grey pop up says, “this web page needed to reload”.  Obviously many people are frustrated that this is happening and they don’t feel they can open a support ticket for fear of being made to feel like an idiot or even worse for fear of losing all their work by “annoying” Baby’s Days.

Mark Kahl director of Baby’s Days has said this issue is because the Baby’s Days system is,

“NOT a website, it is a SaaS application that is very ram and system resource hungry”.

Tonights blog post is going to clarify exactly what Mark Kahl means by this and as with most other things in this blog I’ll hope you’ll see why this statement is very misleading.

Firstly what is a SaaS application?

Mark Kahl is right in that Baby’s Days isn’t a website.  I agree with him there, first time for everything I guess.

SaaS stands for Software as a Service.  Software is usually defined as the programs and other operating information used by a computer.  So on a typical laptop you might find software like Microsoft Word or Norton Anti Virus.  This software is run and stored on your laptop.

SaaS is a different type of software that isn’t actually “run” directly from laptop, it’s usually run through a web browser and stored on a server.  So it’s still software, but it’s not “hard” software in the sense that most people might be more used to; it’s not a disc you can pick up for example it’s virtual software.

A website isn’t a programme at all, it’s just a document if you like stored on the internet.  That’s the easiest way to explain it although if you want to be a purist it’s not 100% accurate, but it’s good enough for the purposes of this blog post.

Does SaaS require a load of RAM?

There is absolutely nothing in the Geek Bible that says a “SaaS” is or should be inherently more resource heavy than any other aspect of web browsing.  My understanding is that the whole point of a SaaS is to remove the resource heavy part of the software off of the persons computer and on a server in the cloud.  So it then seem ludicrous to say the reason the system is crashing is because SaaS applications are more resource heavy!

Does my device have enough RAM to do what most would expect from a typical SaaS application?

If you can watch a video on YouTune then in my opinion your device has plenty of RAM to operate a SaaS application like Baby’s Days.  Closing apps that may be “on” in the background (as frequently advised by support) wont stop Baby’s Days crashing.  If you can load Youtube on your device then chances are that RAM isn’t the issue and if it is the issue you need to question what exactly BDs is loading up that’s bigger than your average Youtube video?

So what’s the conclusion?

As ever I believe Mark Kahl and the support staff are using Geek talk to mystify people rather than dealing with actual issues present in the Baby’s Days software.

If people have facebook open (not a SaaS App but an awesome platform that updates in real time, plays videos automatically, loads constant photos etc) but babysdays crashes then it’s pretty obvious where a big chunk of the issue is.  Do not be fooled by the smoke screen of “awww poor love it’s because it’s SaaS, don’t worry you wont understand it, just believe me”.

It may be that some people have low ram machines, but then you have to ask the question what is Babys Day’s trying to load into memory that is so large that it makes things fall over?

If they’ve potentially coded a site bad enough that it’s crashing people’s browsers or devices, the problem is in their coding, not in the site being “resource hungry”.  SaaS or website, there’s no reason to ever use enough ram or CPU to crash anything; despite what Mark Kahl says Baby’s Days and any system like it uses a fraction of what sites like Youtube or similar high quality media SaaS sites do, and they can manage it without crashing anything.

I hope this post helps those feeling really frustrated with the system at the moment have the courage to open a ticket with support and get the issue sorted. Just becasue you do not have an IT degree it does not mean the issue “must be your end”.  You pay a lot of money for this service, the least it could do is actually work.

Make sure you pop back tomorrow when I’ll be blogging about the changes in Baby’s Days customer service over the years and the recent server downtime that many customers may not be aware of.

Sys IQ Ltd has not complied with Principle 7 of the Data Protection Act.

So it’s been confirmed by the ICO that one part of my problem with my data being withheld by Baby’s Days has been resolved at least.  Despite knowing we wanted the data back, Baby’s Days went ahead and deleted the data anyway.  The ICO have found that because this child’s data has been deleted by Baby’s Days / Sys IQ Ltd, they have not complied with Principle 7 of the Data Protection Act.

There are Eight Principles to The Data Protection Act and from my understanding Principle 7 – which is labelled “security”, is about, you guessed it – security.  How ironic that a company plugging itself as “100% secure” has not complied with the part of the DPA relating to Security!

The ICO website says Pinciple 7:

means you must have appropriate security to prevent the personal data you hold being accidentally or deliberately compromised

So which was it do you think blog readers?  Was my co-minders daughters data accidentally compromised, in which case, how can you be sure this won’t happen to any data you have stored with the company?

Or do you think my co-minders daughters data was deliberately compromised, in which case, again, how can you be sure this won’t happen to any data you have stored with the company?

Either option doesn’t exactly scream 100% secure to me.  What this now means is that under the DPA I have the right to take this matter to court, which obviously I intend to do.  If anyone reading this might know someone who would like to take the case get in touch via the contact option on the blog or through Facebook.

Be aware. Parents can access other children’s photos.

Hi folks, I’m definitely on the mend and have most blog posts for the next week already drafted.  I was going to post tonight about the ICO and their final decision about Baby’s Days / Sys IQ acting illegally and beyond the scope of the Data Protection Act; but I decided to post something more important, especially if you are a current Baby’s Days user.

Last night I received a blog comment from a parent of a child who is on a Baby’s Days subscription owned by a nursery.  The parent is a web developer and wanted to write a script so that photos from the diary would automatically download to his home computer when he ran a programme.

The parent quickly found he was able to access not only his child’s photos but also all of the other children’s photos on the system and also photographs of parents signatures!

From my limited understanding of this, this is because of the way the code is set up.  If you look at the code (which most parents wouldn’t, but they are perfectly entitled to) it provides a “path” if you like, direct to data.  Each parents path should lead them only to their child.  But in this case Baby’s Days had decided to basically remove the “fence” around the paths so that parents could access any path and whatever photos they wanted.

I know most parents provide permission for all parents to see their childs photos so this might not be a big deal to some (!!!) but also you have to remember parents access Baby’s Days on their phones.  If that phone is lost anyone picking it up would have access to the over 100,000 images this nursery has saved.  Also I’m pretty confident parents wouldn’t feel comfortable with anyone being able to save and copy their electronic signature?  Also you have to ask if this could happen with photos could it happen with medical forms or concerns forms?  Would a child be placed in danger by a parent accidentally coming across a “concern” form for example?  These are very important questions that anyone using Baby’s Days really needs to be asking themselves.

The parent contacted Baby’s Days and they were their usually sunny selves and seemed rather blasé about it.  They even said they would put the “fence” back for now so the paths only led to parents children, but they would take the fence down at a later date when they needed to talk to the nursery again?!

I’ve been planning a post for a while now about data security and the fact that Baby’s Days is designed more around security by obscurity, not by design.  Sadly what this parent has discovered is just the tip of the iceberg and as soon as I have more info I will of course be posting it here.

In the meantime if you are still using Baby’s Days please back up your data and think about what sorts of data you are storing there and what it could mean for the children in your care if it fell into the wrong hands.

Are Baby’s Days really the people you want to do business with?!

You may have noticed a trend to this weeks blog posts. Let’s recap the post titles in date order Mon-Thurs:

1.  Babysday’s buy all domains similar to my blog
2.  Babysday’s buy NobleMinder domain
3.  Babysday’s (potentially) bribe customers to leave only positive reviews on their new website
4.  Babysday’s make false advertising claims

Just from these 4 posts alone it’s no surprise to find that I personally feel this company is very underhand in the way it conducts its business.  And it’s responsible for looking after apparently thousands of childminders data. That thought makes me feel a little bit queasy to be honest.

Last week I mentioned a guest blog post coming on Friday but sadly the guest blogger was up to his eyes and didn’t have time to prepare the material but now finally after a lot of hard work everything is done and I can now publish the guest bloggers post.

Richard Waite is the director of a company that used to be known as megaMinder. megaMinder offer a system almost identical to babysdays, infact I personally believe it has more features than Baby’s Days does and from what I’ve seen it had some of these features way before Baby’s Days.

The key thing about megaMinder is that it’s free. Totally Free. It has (total safe and appropriate) adverts that fund its development. The company is family run and all of the website (the app has been contracted as it needs a different skill set) has been designed in house.

By in house I mean actual in house, staff based in the UK that are part of the company. I don’t mean in house like Baby’s Days use it, to mean some man they found online who lives in the Ukraine or Outer Mongolia.  Anyway because members of the team are actually developers, with the right funding, their system would come on in leaps and bounds.

If all megaMinders customers opted to pay for the system and remove the adverts (which is an option they offer) then it would put Baby’s Days in serious shit poop.

So what did Baby’s Days do about this potential business rival?

Set up some unique selling points for their own software? Ummm no.

Improves customer service so it surpasses all others in the market? Definitely not?

Fix some of the minor problems that customers have on the system that would help significantly, like the iphone screen moving? Ermmm no.

In their typical fashion, obviously following the Dummies Guide on, “How Not To Do Business,” they trademarked their competitors brand name!!! Why would you even think that’s a good idea? 

Any questions about this blog post, please let me know and anything I can’t help with I will. Anything I don’t know, Richard is very helpful so I will pass along to him. The most important thing is that all current users of megaMinder have nothing to worry about, their service will continue as normal and their data will not be affected.

Here is the announcement from megaMinder, now called Minding Matters:

To all our customers, users and visitors

We would like to inform you that we have now rebranded our company for various reasons.

Whilst doing a google search on our company megaMinder in the beginning of September 2014 last year a link popped up to the Intellectual Property Office and we found the following. IPO

With further investigation it came to light the owner of an opposition company called baby’s days has opened another company called sysiq with whom they are associated with and trademarked our company brand megaMinder and what we offer our clients. (WOW what a great team these guys must be to work with.)

Now we could have very easily have opposed their application for the trademark however we felt that it would be negative and time would be wasted instead of focusing on the more important things like giving great customer focused software and services to our existing and new clientele.

The aggressive efforts they are going to try have a stranglehold of the market is not quite one would think reasonable and is totally unjustifiable.

Are these people you want to do business with? NO THANK YOU

So congratulations baby days / sysiq on acquiring your new trademark we wish you all the success and hope you manage to explain to your existing and new customers why you would want to conduct your business in this manner.

The rest of this week will be a week long special about Minding Matters, so make sure you pop back and don’t forget you can subscribe for updates!


Make sure you leave a review for Baby’s Days…… or you won’t get a system update!?

Yesterday, Mark Kahl posted on the Facebook Baby’s Days support group asking people to leave a review as it, “encourages [them] to release fantastic new features onto the system.”

marks-postIf you’re a regular reader of this blog you will know that when Baby’s Days introduced the control centre they refused to update my (fully paid up) system with the update, they refused to tell me why I suddenly wasn’t eligible for updates and they refused to pass my letter of complaint to the director.  I’m not quite sure how they did this given their insistence that all systems are “identical”, but they did and you can read about it here.

Anyway lots of people are very concerned about the wording of the Facebook post made by Mark Kahl on the support group run by Kel Thomas via facebook.  I’ve had numerous messages in my inbox over the last 24 hours asking things like:

If someone doesn’t leave a positive review will they be denied the next update?

Is this review site some sort of method for weeding out those not 100% happy about the system and cutting them off?

Why hasn’t Mark Kahl advertised this review website on the official Baby’s Days like page? Is he concerned that he will get more negative than positive reviews?  After all the support group has all the unsatisfied customers weeded out by admin Kel Thomas, but you can’t stop people reading the official ‘Like page'; all those unhappy people will see the post and will leave a negative review.

I posted on Monday that my fair and accurate review wasn’t published on their review site, I know of a few others that have posted fair and reflective reviews too, but they also were censored.  It turns out they are approving each review individually!


You have to start questioning at this point, is this a review site or a fan club?  Can you imagine if Trip Advisor had to “approve” each review individually?  What a farce!

Also, how many people have something negative to say about Baby’s Days that warrants them needing to approve each “review”.  I’m under the impression I’m the only person in the history of the world EVER, to have had a problem with Baby’s Days (according to them).  They have posted the link to the review site in a closed Facebook group. Surely if it’s just little old me with anything bad to say “approving” each comment is overkill?

In my opinion, you’d only need to approve each comment individually if you were worried you might get “too many” reviews that were “bad”.  Given that this review website has only been advertised in a closed Facebook group how many “bad” reviews are they expecting to warrant this level of scrutiny?

These are the questions that current users of Baby’s Days really need to be asking themselves.  There are still lots of people that believe the theft of my data by Sys IQ Ltd is somehow my own “fault”, I must have deserved it in some way.  Surely no company would treat a customer the way I claim Baby’s Days has treated me, I must be lying, right?

Apart from the fact this blog is fully evidenced, you have to ask, if it’s just me that they have upset with their disgusting customer service why has this blog had over 30,000 views in such a short space of time?  Why are so many people banned from posting on their “like” page?  Why are so many users removed from the Support Group run by Kel Thomas that Mark Kahl, director of Baby’s Days, continues to endorse?

If it’s “just me” why not let my factual and fair comment lie there in with the (supposed) “hundreds” of others?  Wake up and smell the coffee people, it’s not just me that’s why each post has to be “approved”; to keep their little bubble from popping.

And FYI Mark Kahl (my most frequent blog reader) I spent nearly 4 years on my work that you have refused to return, I sure as hell intend to spend at least that getting it all back.

Pop Back tomorrow where I’ll be posting a critique of Baby’s Days false advertising methods and then Friday I’m hoping to be posting a collaborative piece with a guest blogger.  Ohhhh Exciting!